50% of U.S. Households Mobile Only

It’s been on the radar for years but according to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control), the tipping point has been reached. As of 2016, U.S. households are majority mobile phone only: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhis/earlyrelease/wireless201705.pdf.

2 Likes

Wait… why does the CDC keep up with that?

2 Likes

southpaw@rw wrote:

Wait… why does the CDC keep up with that?

Distracted driving, Facebook addiction, messaging addiction… ?

Seems like people are slowly realizing that there’s really no need for a wired telephone line when wireless works at home as well as anywhere else, especially as reliability and familiarity increase. Why waste money on redundant technology? I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s younger and/or more tech-savvy who have cut the (phone) cord moreso than older generations.

If you think about it, a landline for personal use makes little sense. It’s a “home” phone, but how often do you call to talk to someone’s home? You call to talk to a PERSON, so it makes much more sense that a PHONE belongs to a PERSON (not a place) and is with that person wherever they might be.

Landlines still have a place in the business realm (including pseudo-businesses, like governmental agencies, etc), where callers what to reach a particular store, office, service, etc - but not necessarily a specific person. But for personal calling wireless makes far more logical sense than wired.

As for why CDC cares - why not call their landline and ask them?

2 Likes

Seems like people are slowly realizing that there’s really no need for a wired telephone line when wireless works at home as well as anywhere else, especially as reliability and familiarity increase. Why waste money on redundant technology? I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s younger and/or more tech-savvy who have cut the (phone) cord moreso than older generations.

While I can’t survey as widely as the CDC can, this is definitely what I see at work. Young professionals have now had cellphones for a significant part of their lives and see no reason to add the expense of a landline when their cell phone is always at hand. In my own family, my newly-acquired son-in-law was discussing the house he and my daughter will be moving into this weekend, and while discussing what utilities were included in the rent, I asked about whether he’d be subscribing to the local landline phone service. He stared at me for quite a few seconds, baffled, before finally shaking his head and saying, “No.”

What I find interesting about this revelation is that ‘back in the day’, I could instantly recite a phone number for no less than 25 people, more if I had time to think or peck at it.

When someone asks for my, or my family/friends number…I often ‘balk’ for a moment or two… , .

2 Likes

I wanted to get rid of my land line a few years ago but I have DSL and my telco insists that I must have a land line in order to get internet service. That isn’t true, of course, but my only alternative is satellite service.

I don’t blame you! I have started to use Google voice for local Craigslist transactions so that people won’t spam me or someone misuse my number.

That’s their effort to thwart cord-cutters, via either insisting you have a phone, too, else bundling so it costs you the same (or more!) to have only internet. The Cable TV companies do it too - Internet plus a “basic” tier of TV service is the same price or sometimes cheaper than internet only.

The wired phone companies and the cable TV providers see the light at the end of the tunnel and know it’s actually an oncoming train.

Cranial cancer and memory loss.

Hello c1tobor

Yes I can still here the switches in central office. After a while you could tell what number was been dialed if a local call

was made . You could tell what switch dropped a digit or hung up.Well for the good old days an long hours.

Morris

For those wondering why the CDC tracks this information, perhaps hearing from the CDC researcher handling this via NPR will be of interest: Majority Of U.S. Households Are Now Wireless-Only. Why Do Health Experts Track Them? : All Tech Considered : NPR.

He, like the report itself, cites correlations between age, income and risky health behaviors. If one might find correlating these things disheartening, please note I’m reporting not passing judgement.

2 Likes
Message an
Expert customer