Buh Bye

RW never clicked with my family and we have transferred our numbers to T-Mobile. We had a bad start with the non-ringing-phone phenomenon so you basically lost us at hello. The chaotic, redundant and contradictory help pages reminiscent of the bulletin board epoch; the inconsistent responses to requests; the rough handovers between WiFi and cell (I’d call them seamful, not seamless); the frequent plan tweaks; and the bizarre phenomenon of the “underlying” number interfering with my ability to use Lyft all contributed to our departure. The worst issue for me was that after three trips to Canada with my RW phone, I found your assertion that I could use the phone just like at home as long as I was on WiFi to be untrue. Sometimes I could place a call, sometimes I couldn’t, and voicemails and texts came and went in scrambled order, making it impossible to maintain a conversation.

Saving a few bucks was not worth the workarounds, conflicts and apologies made necessary by constantly dropping in and out of communication.

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Well if your not happy, then the best thing to do is move on.

We’re not a heavy phone users, so the few issues that we’ve experienced haven’t been a deal breaker. That being said, I plan to move one of our phones to an AT&T or Verizon MVNO when the phones need replacing to get additional network coverage.

Good luck with your new carrier.

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Are you listening RW?

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Are you listening RW?

Sure we are. Which part would you like us to address?

The OP had the issue a while back with the G1 that we fixed.

It was a terrible issue that we worked very hard to fix. That was a long time ago and required a major Android OS fix to address.

The chaotic, redundant and contradictory help pages reminiscent of the bulletin board epoch; the inconsistent responses to requests.
Not sure where to go with this; our bulletin board (community) is something we are very proud of. I would have to guess on the meaning of everything else.

rough handovers between WiFi and cell (I’d call them seamful, not seamless)
This is almost always caused by poor or high interfered with cellular signals. If we have nothing to hand over to then it can be real bad. Basically, when we try to hand over and the inbound call over cell can’t reach the phone, there are not too many other options to get there. Most other carriers would not have worked in the house to even attempt a hand- over.

the frequent plan tweaks
4 changes in 5 years and our competitors do new plans quarterly. The $19 plan was a beta that we grandfathered. The Unlimited plans were not sustainable but we grandfathered them too. The Refund plans were just not cutting it and were technically unfeasible without us being in the ROM.

bizarre phenomenon of the “underlying” number interfering with my ability to use Lyft all contributed to our departure
Nothing to do with the underlying number, everything to do with Lyft not allowing customers to use VoIP numbers. We are a VoIP company, so there is that. I wish their customers would take them to task for being so strict but there are other ride share options.

The worst issue for me was that after three trips to Canada with my RW phone, I found your assertion that I could use the phone just like at home as long as I was on WiFi to be untrue.
People use phones successfully on WiFi in other countries all the time. We can’t guarantee it, it’s not our network to fix, but many do this without issue.

Sometimes I could place a call, sometimes I couldn’t, and voicemails and texts came and went in scrambled order, making it impossible to maintain a conversation.
Sounds like bad cellular again. Long SMS messages being received out of order is an industry issue since SMS was meant to be small. MMS is how iPhones do it to get around this. We do not have that option if we want to be standards oriented.

We hate to see customers leave, any churn is bad. We have extremely low churn numbers but we are always trying to make things better.

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