Caller ID and long distance number assignment question

number_change
#1

I need my outgoing Caller ID changed and I understand that I need to open a help ticket to get it changed.

However, I am curious as to how the initial caller ID is assigned. In the past, when we would have cell phone numbers assigned, we would get a number that was “local” to our address.

My caller ID is currently displaying as “Alvin.” There is a city 65 miles away from me by that name, that uses the same area codes that my area uses. But, a number from the “Alvin” area would not be “local” to those who live in my community.

I suppose that most people no longer have landlines (and don’t subscribe to “local” only calls) but some people do and calling my phone would be long distance calling for them. Is the “Alvin” that is displayed related to that city, or is it an ID that was previously associated with that number?

BTW … why does the title of a new topic require being at least 15 characters?

#2

@Graammm,

I don’t know for sure whether the Alvin is the city or not. I’d have to guess that it is. Regardless, the root issue seems to be whether people can call you on their local landline phones without incurring long distance fees. As such there are two things I can think of you could do.

Open a Help Ticket with Republic and ask for a local number. Your phone number will change and you’ll need to tell everyone to use this new number.

Use a service such as Google Voice to get a local number that just forwards to your current cell phone. You only have to give out this number to those who need it, everyone else will continue to use your current number.

#3

As Google voice uses the same backbone number provider as Republic [Bandwidth] does if Republic can not get a local number either will; Google voice

#4

Numbers are hosted by rate centers, and there my not have been any numbers open or Republic Telecom partner my not have a presents in your zip code and Alvin was seen as close enough to see if Republic has any near you go to the steps to change your number

As for the 15 character requirement it to prevent undescrptive title [a upper limit was also set to prevent run on titles]

#5

Good point @drm186. However, I assumed that it wasn’t a matter of a local number being unavailable, just that @Graammm didn’t have one.

Even though the long distance thing tends to be divided by area code, in some places it’s long distance between exchanges in the same area code. Meaning 4.4.4-5.5.5-9.9.9.9 might be long distance for 4.4.4-5.5.6-8.8.8.8, even though the area codes are the same.

#6

We require 15 character titles so that people put meaningful questions or full thoughts in there. Remember the question or issue you have may help someone else later and a poor or incomplete topic title will be less likely to be read.

Your caller ID is probably empty. The receiving carrier is probably putting in the city as a default filler. We assign numbers based on the closest available area to your ZIP code. We probably do not have any numbers in your town.

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#7

Thanks @drm186 … I took a look at the “Change my phone number” tool and discovered that there is no point in trying to change the number. Of the four area codes serving our wide area, the newest one (since the others are basically used up) isn’t provided by Republic. Gotta love the debt collectors and other calls for the previous owners of the reassigned numbers.

I was only given one area code option out of the three others. Out of ~73 “cities” served by the 4 area codes, there is only one “city” association that I can select, and it’s not my city.

Fortunately, so far, the number i got through Republic seems to be problem free compared to my prior number though T-Mobile. I will probably keep this one and ditch the one I have through T-Mobile. I am kind of weary getting text messages for password resets for the former owner’s Facebook account. :slight_smile:

1 Like
closed #8

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