Google Wifi Router Now Available from Republic Wireless


#1

The Google Wifi router is now available in our online store!

Google WiFi is an advanced home WiFi system that replaces your old router to give you fast, seamless coverage throughout your entire home—no matter its shape or size*—without signal drops or dead zones.

Learn more!

*Depending on the size of your home, multiple Google Wifi routers may be necessary for seamless coverage.


Google Pixel 2 and Republic
Mesh WiFi - a coming of age technology?
#2

True to Google’s data collection practices, I’m sure whatever strategies you employ for having some online privacy will surely be undermined by this Google router, which have direct access to every byte of information passing through your home internet connection. No thank you.


#4

Google is relentless in it’s pursuit of you personal information. Where that is concerned, a device like this is equivalent to a wolf in sheeps wool.


#6

Every byte of your data goes through your ISP too. I am not sure how this is relevant. I guess to each their own.

Personally, while the Google WiFi router is a little basic for my needs, I think that how basic it is and the ease of setup will be excellent for a lot of people. It just works as intended in most instances. I personally don’t understand the negative view of Google and “they are collecting my data”. They do a lot of business with so many things. They do market research. They aren’t saying, “I wonder what @beachb or @bocephous is doing”. They are collecting completely anonymous metadata.


#8

Don’t you have an Android phone? Isn’t that operating system designed by Google?


#10

Yes, of course. You would think that would be good enough for Google. But, apparently not. Now, they want access to virtually everything that passes through your home internet connection. What better way to get a complete profile of everything about you?

I found it interesting the other day when when I first installed Google Duo on my new MZP. It was initially just set to enable audio. When I toggle the switch to allow video, there was a pop-up screen requesting permission to “record” the video. It didn’t ask to “enable” the video. Being a Google app, it wanted to record the video. I have yet to find access to these records video phone call recordings so I can delete them.


#11

I don’t see a point to continue this conversation with you. Nothing I say will change your mind. I just hope you don’t poison others from getting what is in my opinion a pretty good deal on a router that is very easy to setup.


#12

There are plenty of great routers on the market. I’m not knocking this router’s price or it’s qualities as a good product. I just hope people will be aware of the personal and family privacy they may be giving up by installing one of these as their primary home WiFi router. Virtually every packet is likely filtered to glean any information they can get. And, I don’t know that to be a fact. But, we all know what Google’s mission is. This router is the ideal compliment to that mission. It will, no doubt, be pre-configured to use their own DNS servers, as well.


#13

@coreyk
My posts and opinions are gone. Your right this isn’t about me.


#14

This is the permission. It’s the same reason that the Republic permissions ask to “Record” your call audio. There is no other permission to ask for, it’s just what the permission is called. I’m all for a reasoned conversation, but tinfoil hat assertions aren’t very helpful.


#15

Google’s purpose is, and always has been to sell advertising. That’s where their bread and butter is. Pretty nice everything they do is to support that goal.

And I use Google fiber internet.


#16

I know, tinfoil isn’t for everyone. I like mine. Tis better to be cynic and wrong than apathetic and wronger.


#17

I am scheduled to have Google Fiber installed any day now. Typically, an ISP provides a router as part of that installation. I would assume Google will set me up with one or 2 of these Wifi routers…which means I probably don’t need to buy one. Anyone know about this?

Regarding privacy, I don’t trust my current ISP or anyone else collecting my data. Except Equifax. I trust Equifax 100% with my data. They are rock-solid. :tired_face: So Google is just another ISP collecting all my data…and they already know more about me than my wife or closest friends. Screwed no matter what.

What I do know is my Spectrum (Time Warner) home router SUCKS (that’s the technical term). Frequently my Wifi devices just stop working on the Internet. I reboot my router and get back in business. I’ve replaced it twice. I have given up…and just hoping the move to G Fiber resolves my connectivity issues.

As for my Republic Wireless service and my Moto G4…I’m a happy camper.


#18

While I can understand why this is a concern for many people, what you’re saying about Google collecting every bit of information through this product isn’t accurate. Google lays out exactly what they are and aren’t collecting with their router here. Here’s a particularly relevant bit:

The information your Wifi points and the Google Wifi app collect helps us deliver the best Wi-Fi experience possible. Importantly, the Google Wifi app and your Wifi points do not track the websites you visit or collect the content of any traffic on your network. However, your Wifi points does collect data such as Wi-Fi channel, signal strength, and device types that are relevant to optimize your Wi-Fi performance.

I’m sure this information won’t make concerns about Google disappear, but hopefully we can have a conversation about the actual data collection practices are.


#19

I don’t know which Google Fiber market you’re in, but I’m in the very first one, but was a bit later to get it installed. I have their 5x1 “free” fiber, where I paid a $300 construction fee, and then it’s free for seven years.

It’s been rock solid, with a grand total of one outage in the time I’ve had it… although they did have the notorious issue of having a TV side outage in the Kansas City market, in late October of 2015, in particular during Game 1 of the 2015 World Series.

But I’m not worried about them any more than Spectrum (former Time Warner), AT&T or even worse, Comcast.

I’ve had better up time and solid performance from Google than anything else I’ve ever had.

They also service two of our business locations with their small business service, and the only thing that makes me mad is that they will likely never be available at our main location, because the “Fiberhood” didn’t qualify, in a neighborhood filled with businesses and the homeless.


#20

“The information your Wifi points and the Google Wifi app collect helps us deliver the best Wi-Fi experience possible.”

From what perspective? That is a very ambiguous statement. How do they have any idea what I would consider a great WiFi experience? They don’t. The statement is nothing more than an attempt to alleviate the concerns of the person from whom they are collecting data and profiling. It is essentially meaningless.

That said, Google’s next sentence is somewhat reassuring.

Without a doubt, Google offers good, useful products and services. They do, to some extent, let you control what data they collect from within your Google account. Not conveniently, but for those with the patience and perseverance can somewhat minimize their exposure. But, never forget that Google’s primary goal is to collect your data, profile you and sell that information to the highest bidder. You never really get to see how that information is presented, or to whom.


#21

I am scheduled to have Google Fiber installed any day now. Typically, an ISP provides a router as part of that installation. I would assume Google will set me up with one or 2 of these Wifi routers…which means I probably don’t need to buy one. Anyone know about this?

I think you are making an assumption that is probably untrue. I would bet they would provider a modem/router combo. I know that @dave_kc have Google Fiber. Maybe he can answer this question.

@Troywolf, are you getting gigabit service?


#22

Really? Of course they do. As do you and I. Let’s be real here, with five minutes you and I would write very similar descriptions of what a good Wi-Fi experience is, as would even the least technical user of an internet connected device.


#23

They provide a fiber box that converts from fiber to copper, and then you get a modem/router/access point in one.

Operationally they provide a wireless router with one ethernet port to connect to wired devices, otherwise it’s all intended for wireless. I have enough wired that I added a small switch to spread the data out to my various wired devices.

You manage the router setup online, with very little able to be done on your own directly to the device.


#24

Nice price on these doohickies. I’ve thought about getting three of these for my home for months now. Just can’t pull the trigger.