Huh? Dish and AT&T sign wireless network deal worth at least $5 billion

Perhaps you’re referring to something in addition to Republic but with regard to Republic, there has been precisely one ownership change. DISH bought the Republic brand and certain other assets including us (the customers). Notably, Republic Wireless, Inc. continues on as Relay, Inc.

I suppose it depends on what one means by prepare. If one means take a look around and see what else is out there that might fit one’s needs (in other words a Plan B), I think there’s always something to be said for that. But, I don’t think present circumstances warrant a preemptive jump to another service provider. As frustrating as it might be, I think the best course of action for now is no action (wait and see).

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Thanks for the response man. I was just thinking out loud. So plan B would be some other provider that’s cheaper. My level of usage doesn’t warrant the price. I pay close to $30 for nothing. Either I’m getting a much cheaper deal or I’m out. So in terms of service changes, either we will get a better deal (hoping) or a worse deal (hoping not). Because I love RW and I want to stay with and support.

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Well I pay close to $20 for pretty much Everything that I need from RW. No need to jump ship anytime soon.

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Looks like sometime in the future we all maybe playing Rock, Paper, Scissors.

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The biggest worry I have is that Republic will become unrecognizable at some point, melded into a conglomeration with Boost and Ting, none surviving the same as it was. This sounds like a big first step in that direction.

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Time will tell but not necessarily. DISH’s 10-year agreement for AT&T to be the primary supplier of cellular network services to its’ family of brands (Republic, Boost and Ting) ostensibly replaces its’ existing 7-year agreement with T-Mobile (which resulted from the negotiations surrounding regulatory approval of T-Mobile’s acquisition of Sprint) to do the same. Whether that existing 7-year agreement with T-Mobile will live on to serve as a secondary supplier or whether DISH/T-Mobile agree to end it remains to be seen as well. :man_shrugging:

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I’m not sure how this is relevant to Republic being recognizable. Republic once had Sprint only, then they added T-Mobile. The carrier that they partner with isn’t particularly relevant to who Republic is. Now any changes that DISH makes as far as personnel, plans, etc, those are a lot more relevant to me.

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What impact will today’s announcement (July 19) that Dish and AT&T have signed an agreement for AT&T to provide service for all of Dish’s MVNOs, including Republic Wireless? Will I need a new SIM for my phone that is currently served by T Mobile?

Hi @geezerjohn2,

I appreciate what I’m about to say won’t be particularly satisfying, however, the candid answer to your question is we don’t know yet. As has been the case since the announcement DISH was acquiring Republic, we remain in wait and see mode.

Meanwhile, nothing has changed. When something is going to change (whatever something may be), I’m confident we’ll hear it from Republic loud and clear.

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We can all speculate, but I don’t think any of us actually know with certainty.

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I left ATT specifically, but found RW because of that, so conflicted on this question.

Hope for the best, prepare for the worst?.

Did you leave AT&T because of the coverage or something else? This agreement won’t result in AT&T running Republic. DISH will be operating Republic.

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Oh no, I left AT&T specifically for a ‘cheaper’ cell phone/option.
RW’s ‘wild and radical’ way of providing that service through visionary WiFi concepts, I was ‘hooked’…never looked back at a ‘contract’, that’s for sure.

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This has a bit more detail including some narrative from DiSH’s SEC filling: Dish switching network to AT&T after calling T-Mobile anticompetitive | Ars Technica

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Wow I went from att to republic wireless cause republic wireless wasn’t in the political ■■■■ :roll_eyes:

Hi @christin.zfgm4s and welcome to the Community!

DISH’s (now Republic’s parent company) agreement with AT&T doesn’t mean AT&T has any say in how Republic treats its’ customers or is otherwise operated. Precisely what it does mean for Republic’s customers in terms of network coverage is, as of now, an unknown. :man_shrugging:

Ty so much I hope they stay republic this is sad news I had att they done something to my emergency amber alerts etc why I left

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Editorial in The Verge by Karl Bode (formerly DSLReports Karl):

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Interesting. Thanks for sharing this.

I mostly blame DISH for all of this. They are trying to blame T-Mobile, but I’m not buying it. They could have been more prepared for this if the had tried, but they didn’t put much effort into it. It seems like all they want to do is sit around, complain, and hope that other carriers do all the work for them. I think DISH should stop whining over the CDMA shutdown, get to work moving customers off that legacy network, and speed up their tower rollout. I think a hard cutoff is good as it provides a concrete date that the network will be turned down and they can move forward.

DISH has loads of spectrum that they have been holding for a long time. Why haven’t they been deploying this faster? Maybe if they had deployed it faster, they wouldn’t have to complain so much about the CDMA shutdown…

I think it all comes down to competency. I have serious doubts about DISH’s competency, and time will tell whether I am correct or not.

Whatever they do, grab the :popcorn: and let’s enjoy the show together!

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You raise many valid points, however, the major issue with Boost is Boost customers. Too many of them are using older phones that cannot be used on any network other than Sprint. One might think of it as if the majority of Republic’s members were still on grandfathered plans rather than My Choice.

DISH is facing the reality retaining Boost customers (presuming they want to do so) is going to take heavily subsidizing if not outright giving away phones. The AT&T deal doesn’t help as the Sprint only phones used by a majority of Boost’s current customers won’t work on AT&T’s network anymore than on T-Mobile’s.

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