New! Quickly Block Unknown Calls from the Republic Wireless App

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#120

It’s not. It’s Android operating system dependent. Republic is leveraging a feature built into Android 7 (Nougat) and later. Your Moto E2 runs Android 5 (Lollipop), which lacks the needed feature.

Not at all.


#122

Do you use this app? I’m looking for an app that stops blocked callers from going to voicemail.


#123

vickih.geimxh,
So far Mr. Number has been the best at blocking unwanted calls but it’s not perfect. I still can get blocked calls going to voicemail. I don’t think you are going to find any app that blocks that from happening. I’ve tried several and none of them work and were worse at blocking calls in general.


#124

What’s weird is that new spam calls look like their from my area code or even close to my number. It’s not as easy and this person lives far away and I wouldn’t be getting a call from them anymore. They’re usually different numbers too. But anything that helps is good news.


#125

That’s quite common, it is know as Neighbor Spoofing:



#126

You should not block spoofed local numbers because the person sending the spam does not own it, or use it more than once (usually) – the number you are blocking is a real local number that could belong to a local business, a friend or neighbor, or may even be your number (because the last four digits of the spoofed number are chosen randomly).


#127

I don’t believe there’s a universal truth here. My experience with local numbers being spoofed is there are times it’s a one-off and other times not so much. While I’m fully aware the folks owning the number may not be the source of the problem; if I know those local numbers do not belong to someone I’m likely to need to communicate with, I might very well block them.


#128

Same here. It seemed that every time I blocked a call, two (or more) would come through in its place. If I just ignored them, the number of spam calls decreased.

It doesn’t sound like this new feature will help much.


#129

Please add the ability to use pattern matching to auto-block. Include PCRE support as well. This would make a nice feature perfect and bullet-proof.


#130

This functionality is being replaced by the new automated spam blocking.


#131

How will the auto blocker deal with the high volume of foreign calls spoofing Texas numbers?


#132

Hi @chris.nqdwj9j,

You can still use the Android call-blocking function from the dialer menu. The RW app just won’t prompt you for it any more.

The new feature will block calls from numbers that have proven to be spam numbers. If the callers you referenced are frequently changing their number, they may not be included in the blocking feature.

Hopefully between the two functions, you’ll be able to drastically reduce the number of spam calls you are receiving.


#133

All of that is nice. But…

My phone is running 7.0 and receives an average of two to four spam calls from TX per day. The call originator is spoofing the CID with a different TX number every time. 98%+ are using a 214 area code. The RW app misses every single one of them. None of these calls is blocked, routed to VM, or otherwise intercepted. My phone’s block list has hundreds of these numbers on it simply because the call originator never uses the same number twice. (Which permits them to escape violating the national “do not call” laws… even if one could prosecute call originators located in the Orient.)

Unfortunately, none of RW’s current solutions correct this problem.

One solution which would correct the problem would be to allow the user to add “filters” to the call block application. The best option would be to allow it to use regular expressions. This would permit the user to construct a filter to, say, block all numbers from area code 214. (Yes, I realize that Publisher’s Clearing House may use a 214 number to notify its “winners,” but that’s a risk I’ll take… :grin:)

Until such a solution is implemented, generic “do-not-call” list checking, “spam” list checking, etc. will fail with this sort of scenario every time.

This solution would be very similar to blocking blocks of IP addresses at a firewall. And I would think it would be trivial to implement in RW’s current blocking application.


How to Stop Unwanted Spam Calls
#134

We don’t actually know that. Many carrier side solutions don’t use the CID number as the blocking determination. I have no idea what the new Republic solution uses, but it’s premature to say how effective or ineffective it will be given the release of the functionality is so new and none of us know the methodology being used to block calls.


#135

Maybe you are referring to this sort of thing:

Verizon uses a “A complex and always-improving algorithm…”

Sprint states that “Incoming phone calls are flagged based on real-time analytics of calling patterns seen across the nation.”

Yet all of these come with standard disclaimers.

I certainly am all in support of RW chipping in to the SPAM call blocking experiment, but at the end of the day, nothing will work as well as the ability for the end user to craft their own filters.

Incidentally, since the block notices have stopped on my phone, there has been no substantial reduction of the problem. A custom filter will fix my problem instantly.


#136

The idea behind preemptive call blocking for numbers identified as spam is to relieve the end user of the need to craft their own filters. If one never receives the call, there is nothing to craft. That said, I agree preemptive blocking alone will not block all unwanted calls. While Android’s native dialer continues to allow blocking individual unwanted calls, doing so quickly grows tedious when the spammers are rotating spoofed numbers.

Ultimately, I’d like to see an all of the above approach (preemptive blocking coupled with the ability for end users to create supplemental block lists using what I’ll refer to as wildcards. So, for example, 214* would block area code 214, 214657* would block the 657 exchange in area code 214 etc. Frankly, this wildcard approach might be better implemented by Google into Android than relying on carriers but I’m not opposed to Republic finding a way to do it.

Meanwhile, I applaud Republic for adding preemptive blocking without taking anything away. The previous blocking method in the Republic app was just another way to access Android’s native call blocking facilities such as they are.


#137

This is exactly what I was proposing in my original post: the best of all worlds.

Very true.


#138

"Blocked numbers can still leave you a voicemail, in case you block an important number. "

This makes sense, but it would also be a good idea to allow users to make the call as to whether or not a number is allowed to leave a voicemail. The default could be to allow a blocked number to leave a message, but also allow users to intentionally block voicemail as well if/when they consider it necessary.

I routinely receive voicemail messages from one particular number. I have already blocked it, but now I’m getting voicemail messages (about once a week).


#139

Hi @dnlharold,

This is an older announcement, from an earlier app release. The newer spam-blocking tool we have rolled out does allow you the option to block calls from reaching voicemail. You can now use both tools - Republic Wireless spam blocking and Android spam blocking.
You can read more about these features here.

Our help center article to help with configuration is here:

I’ll lock this Announcement so that others will be directed to the newer content.


#140