Reactivate GSM Sim after bad activation with CDMA SIM

What phone do you have? Moto G7 Play

What plan are you on? My Choice

Does your plan include data, or just talk & text? talk & text, 1 gb data

After activating my Moto G7 Play with a GSM Sim card, I tried to activate a cdma sim on it and did not activate and then said the phone had be reported stolen. I put back in the orginal activated GSM sim and it won’t reactivate with that and still says the phone is stolen. I guess the Moto G7 Play phone is not compatible with republics CDMA network even though it is with sprints. I did this for my Dad prior to checking the phone for compatibly as I thought he already did that.

From:

The Moto G7 Play is available for purchase only in specific coverage areas because it can currently support only our GSM SIM card.

My advice would be to first perform a factory reset, then attempt activation with the GSM SIM card. If the Moto G7 Play becomes capable of using Republic’s CDMA card in the future, you can order one by opening a help ticket.

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I believe that is what they told him to do. My only question is, does republic have the IMEI number blacklisted somewhere in there system that is still going to prevent the phone from correctly activating after the reset? I only ask, because the message on the phone saying it has been stolen suggest that Republics network is sending back this error, but maybe that’s not the case.

Hi @jasonk.8mqiz6,

Has the message regarding the phone being stolen survived the factory reset? I’m also curious, if you don’t mind sharing, what was the source of the CDMA SIM you attempted to activate the G7 with?

I’m not sure how Republic’s back office systems work. I was assuming the stolen phone message was false, and a result of trying to activate with an incompatible SIM card. You’ll have to cross that bridge if/when you come to it.

My father has not done the factory reset yet, he’s waiting on me to have time to help him. I’m just trying to get as much info as I can up front to try to minimize the time it takes to get his phone going again. It was a Republic CDMA Sim that I think I received in Dec. of 2018

I’m inclined to agree with @cbwahlstrom that the stolen phone message is a false positive. Certainly, no one has reported the G7 stolen. Was the referenced CDMA SIM ever activated in another phone?

Good to know, that it sounds like there isn’t anything on Republics network side that would lead to the stolen phone message. Again, I’m just trying to gather as much info up front so I can try to get this phone working for my Father with minimal time. The CDMA Sim had never been activated.

I will note there are different types of CDMA SIMs and they are

  • cSIM which are used in Moto X Pure, G4, G4 Play, G4 Plus, G5 Plus, Samsung Galaxy S7, S7 Edge, Nexus 6, 5X, 6P, Pixel, Pixel XL
  • iSIM (will have a “C2” on the SIM) which are used in Moto Z2 Play, X4, E4, E4 Plus, G5S Plus, G6, Samsung Galaxy S8, S8 Plus, Note 8, Pixel 2 Pixel 2 XL
  • SIMOTA (will have a “C3” on the SIM) which are used in Moto Z3 Play, Moto G6 Play, Samsung Galaxy S9, S9 Plus, Note 9 S10, S10 Plus, S10E, Pixel 3, Pixel 3 XL
  • TBD a new one which is not ready yet for the Moto G7, G7 Play, G7 Power and future phones

the best way to know what type of SIM one would need is in this table Detailed Supported Phone Features

Swapping SIM cards to change phones is a GSM feature
Active CDMA SIM cards can not be moved to another phone (a deactivated or never activated CDMA SIM card can be moved over to a phone compatible with that type of SIM card and activated (assuming phone is already in the Republic system by 1st being activated on GSM) (deactivated SIM card expire after 20 days.)

Thanks for the additional information. I was not aware of there being 4 types of cdma sim cards, only different sized sims. Obviously the issue we have is due to the G7 Play not yet having a CDMA Sim that is ready for Republic Wireless. This is my error for not double checking what I thought my Father had already verified. The CDMA card I had was for a Galaxy S7 or a cSIM.

In my opinion the requirement to activate all new phones on the GSM network continues to be a major issue with Republics Service. This causes activation delays, confusion, frustration and complexity to anyone who needs to be on the CDMA network, especially for those who are technically challenged. I have not and probably won’t suggest anyone switch from their current providers to Republic as long as this current setup requirement is in place. I still think a standard activation kit, which includes all possible SIM Cards along with detailed instructions on how to activate a new phone on either network would be the best solution.

Being an expert that has answered nearly 50,000 questions through that program I can tell you this would be a catastrophe. The average customer isn’t savvy enough to follow even detailed instructions on how to do this. Even a single SIM is often a problem which is why Republic now spends the time/dollars to insert the SIM in the phone for customers when the phone is bought from them. Heck, even getting the battery in to the phones with removable batteries is often an issue. That being said, Republic has recently figured out the technical side and will now work with customers, through a support ticket, to go directly to CDMA on BYOP phones without having to GSM activate first. This is not done by sending every possibility but rather by ascertaining which SIM they need and sending the right one.

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as @louisdi states a CDMA BYOD can be done via a support ticket, just open a ticket give the IMEI number (or phone number of a current active phone), 3 addresses of where the phone will be used and validate you shipping address. all documented here How to Request a 3.0 CDMA SIM Card – Republic Help

I will also note SIMs are not free and shipping even 2 (and to cover all one would need to ship 4 and soon 5 SIMs would add cost to the BYOD, (the current 1 SIM $5+shipping would be $25+shipping) and most of the SIMs would just go in the trash as only one would be needed

That being said, Republic has recently figured out the technical side and will now work with customers, through a support ticket, to go directly to CDMA on BYOP phones without having to GSM activate first. This is not done by sending every possibility but rather by ascertaining which SIM they need and sending the right one.

This is good news to me that I’m not sure how I would find this out had you not just told me. Again, frustration and lack of info.

In regards to my last post “I still think a standard activation kit” as stated my opinion. If detailed instructions with very precise illustrations and instruction wouldn’t work, than I have no clue how these people would ever be able to accomplish what they need to through email ticket support or even a chat. Maybe a phone call, but Republic doesn’t offer phone support either, which I understand from a cost perspective, but for some matters in order to not delay the support, I think it should be offered.
We submitted a ticket at 9:00 pm the other night and waited 45 minutes for a response on this problem, then gave up and called it a night. I think my dad said when he checked the next morning the response came around midnight. I was than at work all day and tied up last night now back at work, so I can’t help him resolve this until tonight (maybe). So he’s been without a phone since 8:00 pm Sunday night, yes due to his own misunderstanding that his phone would not work on Republics CDMA network even though it will on Sprints, which he thought was all that needed verified when he bought it at Best Buy (again confusing to most, especially those not as technical) I think he’d be willing to try it on his own if he could talk to someone, but he can’t.

They are given instructions to find the IMEI on their phones, then the one right SIM is sent to them. Far less complicated that a package of 6 SIM cards that you have to figure out yourself. Not to mention the cost of such a package.

That’s just not right. Republic doesn’t offer an 800 number, but when an issue is too complicated, or the user is unable to resolve the issue by email/chat then Republic happily offers phone support as the next line of support. It requires and invite, but is available.

Three hours is a pretty reasonable response time and let’s be frank here, this was an issue caused by a user attempting something that wasn’t supported, as you’ve stated.

Hi @jasonk.8mqiz6,

Are you able to review the support ticket your father has open with our team? If so, please do so before taking any additional action on your father’s phone.

Thanks for bringing up the confusion that exists around the ability to offer cellular service on either of two cellular carriers. We’re continually working on improvements to better surface this information to our members. Our goal is to provide the best coverage experience for each member, and obviously we can’t do that if they have one SIM card when they need the other. We’re aware of the need for improvements and have some changes in the works.

This issue seemed complicated enough as I tend to think of myself as fairly technical. I was flying a little blind on this one as I had not been provided all of the correct information, had I been from both my father in regards to the phone and Republic in regards to (4) types of SIM cards, I never would’ve tried the CDMA card I had. We did first try resolving it with a chat and were not offered phone support, but instead only email support. I don’t think I have ever been offered phone support, but maybe I have or maybe the definition of “too complicated” is too subjective. I will say costly, is also sending out (3) Sim cards and (2) for my daughter as well via overnight express on the last phones they were trying to transfer from GSM to CDMA and they still had to wait 3+ days for them to arrive due to issues at the warehouse getting them shipped.

I’ve just came to the conclusion that I think others our coming to, which is some of the cost savings offered by Republic isn’t worth the headache for some. It’s just not for the non-tech savvy. My Dad’s about ready to to switch to someone else due to this mess (I know he caused a lot of it himself). Honestly, as soon as Spectrum offers BYOD for unlocked Androids I’m seriously considering making the switch to them. This pains me, as I’ve loved Republic and what their original mission seemed to be, but as they evolve, it just doesn’t continue to give me the same warm and fuzzy.

I get your points and I understand the reasoning, just like the elimination of the refund plans the majority is the direction Republic has to go, or has chosen to go. And answering nearly 50,000 questions through that program certainly is the majority over me and some select individuals that would have no problem at all figuring out how to activate a Kit of 6 Sim cards.

Thanks for your help and additional info, I always to find the majority of good information on this forum and you have helped me out more than once, which is much appreciated.

Jason

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I will have and will do so before doing anything else.

Thanks

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Agreed, but let’s say that 1% of customers need to switch from the original coverage they have. Is the cost of handling that 1% less or more than the cost of having sent everything to the 99% that never will and then in addition, the additional support costs involved in the confusion it will inevitably cause the vast majority of customers?

In addition what we aren’t accounting for here is who Republic wants customers to activate with, all things being equal. SPECULATION AHEAD – Based on the way things work it appears to me that Republic wants to steer people to T-Mobile as the partner, when things are equal. My SPECUALTION is based on the fact that it appears that if you have equal coverage (or what Republic determines to be adequate GSM coverage) you get a GSM SIM. In addition, in its FCC filings in support of the T-Mobile/Sprint merger they refer to T-Mobile as their “primary” partner.

Those things put together lead me to the conclusion that not only are multiple SIMs a bad customer experience idea and a bad cost idea, they likely don’t serve Republic’s business goals as far as activations.

Absolutely, but you can’t design a program for the 1% (or maybe 0.1%).

You’re welcome, it is always great to find someone that’s open to debate and discussion without taking everything personally!

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This reasoning I was agreeing with in my previous post even though it stinks for me the minority in this case.

In regards to T-Mobile, here again I believe your speculation is probably dead on, which is just another reason why there’s a good chance Republic may not be for me in the future. I live in a rural area, which is sometimes even spotty with Sprint and believe it or not even Verizon, so there’s no way T-Mobile’s network works for me no matter what their maps might say.

I wouldn’t count T-Mobile out. Their B71 expansion is pretty aggressive (and they bought a lot of that spectrum and are awaiting clearance of it by the TV stations) and if the Sprint Merger goes through, once the networks are combined they’ll have coverage that rivals or bests AT&T and Verizon.

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